AdyaShanti's Natural State of Consciousness

Adyashanti

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Adyashanti (Sanskrit word meaning, "primordial peace"), is a spiritual teacher from the Bay Area who gives regular Satsangs in the United States and also teaches abroad. He is the author of several books, CDs and DVDs and is the founder of Open Gate Sangha, Inc. a nonprofit organization that supports, and makes available, his teachings.

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 Spiritual background

Born Steven Gray in 1962, Adyashanti studied Zen for 14 years under the guidance of his Zen teacher Arvis Joen Justi. Justi was a student of Taizan Maezumi Roshi of the Zen Center of Los Angeles. Gray (Adyashanti) was regularly sent by Arvis to Zen sesshins, where he also studied under Jakusho Kwong Roshi of the Sonoma Mountain Zen Center. At age 25 he began experiencing a series of transformative spiritual awakenings (see Bodhi). In 1996, around eight years later, he was invited to teach by Arvis Joen Justi. However, because Justi never underwent the traditional Zen ceremony of Dharma transmission—though still instructed to teach by Maezumi—Adyashanti is not an official Dharma heir of any particular Zen tradition. Rather he is Arvis Justi's successor in a lay lineage originally authorized by Taizan Maezumi.

  Open Gate Sangha

Sangha is a term used in several Sanskrit–derived languages of India to refer to a spiritual "assembly" or community, traditionally a monastic one, but its usage varies. Adyashanti founded Open Gate Sangha, Inc. in 1996 when he began teaching. This Sangha refers to both the organization itself and his student community as a whole. The Organization runs on a small staff, as well as many volunteers, and helps coordinate Adya's (as he is called by his students) teaching and travel schedule. It also produces audio, visual and written material for publication.

 Bibliography

 References


This article may contain improper references to self-published sources. Please help improve it by removing references to unreliable sources, where they are used inappropriately. (August 2011)

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 External links

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